Top places to see in Xian

Top places to see in Xian

Top places to see in Xian? Forest of Stone Steles Xi’an Forest of Stone Tablets was originally built in 1087. The Forest of Stone Steles in Xi’an holds a big collection of steles in China. It is a classical courtyard styled structure at the site of former Confucian Temple in Sanxue Street, Xian, close to the south gate of Xi’an City Wall. The museum has an area of over 30,000 square meters. It is one of the centers of ancient Chinese stone-engraving classic. It is also the center of the works of art of noted calligraphers of past dynasties. The numerous standing steles likens a forest, hence the name ” Forest of Steles”. With a history of over 900 years, it is an art treasure well known at home and abroad.

It’s a sad fact that night markets are relatively rare in Hong Kong – certainly when compared to Bangkok or Taiwan. This is why Temple Street is such a popular spot once the sun goes down. It’s then that the numerous stalls pop up, the wares appeare and the tourists flock to purchase those ‘I love HK’ t-shirts, knock-off watches and the rest. The locals, by contrast, tend to come to consult the fortune-tellers.

China is a fascinating place if you are looking for ancient history mixed with modern attractions exploration. A remarkable act of smart city planning and preservation can be seen in Shanghai’s splendid riverside promenade, the Zhongshan Lu, perhaps better known as the Bund (Wàitan). As you stroll this wide pedestrian zone along the Huangpu Jiang River, you’ll almost forget you’re bang-smack in the middle of China’s largest city (Shanghai’s population exceeds 24 million people). Famous for its European feel, a fact owed to the district’s past as the location of the city’s International Settlement, the Bund is popular for its 52 preserved English- and French-influenced buildings, many now restaurants, cafés, stores, and art galleries. Representing a variety of influences from Gothic to Renaissance styles — including a number of Art Deco buildings — the architecture includes highlights such as the old harbor customs office, with its bell tower, and the majestic Peace Hotel. For the best views of the Bund, visit the 468-meter Oriental Pearl Tower on the opposite bank of the Huangpu Jiang River. If time allows, be sure to also visit the Yu Garden. Known affectionately as the “Garden of Happiness,” this must-see garden can trace its roots back to 1559 when it was laid out (many of the original structures survive to this day). See additional details on Beijing tours.

Echoing Sand Mountain is a series of dunes surrounding Crescent Lake. Named for its distinctive shape and aural characteristics, its echoes can be heard as the wind blows over the dunes. Visitors ride camels up the dunes, which rise to 250 meters. With gardens blooming on its banks, Crescent Lake offers a lovely visual counterpoint to all that sand. Echoing Sand Mountain and Crescent Lake is six kilometers south of Dunhuang. China Southern operates a daily return flight between Xi’an Xianyang Airport and Dunhuang Airport. Air China flies between Beijing and Dunhuang once a day.

Located in the very heart of Beijing, magnificent Forbidden City, also known as Imperial Palace Museum, is the symbol of imperial power. Built in Yongle Period, Ming Dynasty (1406 – 1420 AD), it is the largest and well-preserved wooden building complex of the world. These were laid out very precisely in accordance with a feudal code of architectural hierarchy which designated specific features for reflecting the paramount authority and status of the emperor. Forbidden City can be taken as a sample of the traditional Chinese palatial architecture. In 1987, it became a World Heritage Site. Besides, it is also listed by UNESCO as the largest collection of preserved ancient wooden structures in the world.

Travelers along the ancient Silk Road will definitely want to stop at Dunhuang for a visit to the Mogao Caves, which are representative of early Buddhist cave art. Unlike the Yungang Caves, which featured Buddhas carved into hillsides, the Mogao Grottoes mostly feature murals painted on cave walls. Some of the paintings date back to the fourth century. At one time, there were more than 1,000 cave temples. The Longji or Dragon’s Backbone rice terraces were built over 500 years ago during the Ming Dynasty. The terrace fields are found in Longsheng about a two hours drive from Guilin. From a distance, during the growing season, these winding terraces appear as if they were green woven cables laid out over the hillsides, starting at the riverbank and ending near the mountaintop. Visitors can meander through the paddies and villages, greeting and being greeted by horses, pigs, chickens and hard working locals. Discover even more details on China Travel Tours.

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