Europe’s top yacht sailing places

Europe’s top yacht sailing places

Yachting destinations and boat sailing news with IntersailClub? The brackish inland sea is bound by the Scandinavian Peninsula, Europe mainland and the Danish islands. Although most of us would not think of going island-hopping in Germany, it offers some really unique locations. Start at Stralsund and include the wild sweeping landscapes of the car-free Hiddensee island and the deserted white sand beaches of Rugen island. If you can, extend your trip to include the beautiful Stockholm archipelago and the Danish Islands which includes Isle of Langeland where wild horses roam.

Sitting on the eastern tip of Croatia’s coast, Dubrovnik is ideal for those looking to take some time out to recharge and enjoy the delights of discovering a new city. Bordered by sparkling Adriatic water, Dubrovnik is known for its Gothic architecture, dramatic terrain and buildings capped by baked clay-red rooves. The pace of life is slower in the city, so be sure to take some time to walk the stone streets and soak up the charms of Croatia. Trees grow everywhere, infusing the air with the scent of sweet figs and bitter oranges, for which Dubrovnik is renowned. If you’re visiting during summer, you’d be remiss not to check out the Dubrovnik Summer Festival. This celebration of classical musical sees the city come to life with music and art, with plenty of concerts and recitals on the schedule. Discover more details on https://intersailclub.com/.

Portugal is a brilliant country to visit for a number of reasons. If you are planning a sailing holiday, then Portugal becomes even more desirable. This country has a stunning coastline and some world-class islands. With a rich history, delicious food, and plenty of historic sites. Portugal is always a good idea. Some top cruising destinations in Portugal include Madeira (one of Europe’s best islands) and Lisbon (the capital city). Between these, there are many other worthy places to visit.

Sailing tip of the day: The plotter’s track function can help you in tight harbors! It’s fun to look back over a summer’s cruising by way of the track my chartplotter has recorded. Where the track really comes into its own, though, is piloting out of a difficult harbor into which you have successfully maneuvered. You know you got in OK, so to be sure of a graceful exit—tide permitting where appropriate—you’ve only to follow the same track out again. Be warned, though, that this works only so long as the plotter is set upright. The screengrab shows two versions of the same in-and-out tracks on my Raymarine unit. The coarse setting shown in purple is useless, while the finer, black version leads me straight back out through the drying banks. It’s all down to setting the instrument to record frequent data. In short, to succeed in close quarters, the plot should be set to record at shorter time or distance intervals than out at sea.

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