Amazing Mediterranean yacht sailing destinations and yacht sailing recommendations today by IntersailClub

Amazing Mediterranean yacht sailing destinations and yacht sailing recommendations today by IntersailClub

Beautiful Mediterranean yachting destinations 2021? The French Riviera has no shortage of trendy outposts, but St Tropez earns extra points for its recent revamp along Pampelonne Beach. YachtCharterFleet had the pleasure of heading down to St Tropez last year to check it out; and came back with some first-hand insight into the new (eco-friendly) beach club scene. After a morning exploring the pink streets of St Tropez, cruise over to Pampelonne in time for lunch. Be sure to book ahead for Club 55, the most iconic venue in the Cote d’Azur, and try and reserve a coveted table in the later lunchtime slot if you’re looking to rub shoulders with Hollywood heavyweights and the A-list elite. For some post-lunch entertainment, head to Verde Beach. Expect blast-from-the-past beats and dancing on the tables, as the St Tropez in-crowd transform Verde Beach into the most happening party in Pampelonne. Head back to the main port for dinner- L’Opera has got the ‘the dinner and a show’ concept down to an art.

As the Ionian Islands are a popular choice for yachting holidays, they are well equipped for visitors. You can expect great ports here, complete with all amenities and help that you may need. And renting a yacht for an Ionian Island cruise holiday is easy. The Argolic and Saronic Gulf is a riviera that covers some of the best of ancient Greece. You could choose an amazing sailing itinerary around here, as there are many fantastic islands and ports to discover.

Many may think the glitzy South of France is a victim of its own popularity but it’s still one of the most beautiful sailing destinations in Europe, if not the world. Start at celebrity haunt Saint-Tropez and make your way along the celebrated coastline stopping off at Cannes, Nice and the millionaire playground, Monaco. If you want to fit in, pack your finest clothes, charter a huge yacht and pose artfully on the deck every time you moor up. See more info on intersailclub.com.

The base charter fee in essence refers to the hire cost of the yacht itself, with all equipment in working order in addition to the cost of food and wages for the crew during the entirety of the charter. This is essentially all the base charter fee covers with additional expenses often applicable on top. The base charter fee will vary from one yacht to another and this may be down to any number of reasons from size and on board amenities to the charter season. For instance, the base rate of a charter yacht may increase in “high season” and reduce during the “low season”. “High season” and “low season” refers to the busiest and slowest periods for yacht charters though this may appear misleading, as these peak times refer to periods of weeks as opposed to full seasons. In addition, you may find that a yacht is also more expensive during special events such as the Monaco Grand Prix, Cannes Film Festival and America’s Cup. Unless you are keen to charter a yacht for a particular “high season” event, choose your dates carefully as although a “high season” rate will be more expensive than the “low season” the two can sometimes share much of the same weather conditions. Under Mediterranean Yacht Brokers Association (MYBA) charter contracts, which are arguably the most common, the charterer is charged for food and beverage (for the charter guests only), fuel, dockage and harbor fees, and miscellaneous expenses. As a round number, which depends on how much fuel the yacht uses and how fancy the meals and drinks, you can expect to add 25% to 50% of your charter cost.

Sailing tip of the day: Overlaying radar on the chart helps to interpret the display! The biggest problem most of us face when interpreting radar is lack of familiarity. We go about our daily business most of the year, then come aboard, hit the fog and turn it on. Unfortunately, unlike GPS, AIS and the rest, radar is more of a conversation between the operator and the instrument, so it’s not surprising we have trouble interpreting the picture. When I’m motoring, I, therefore, make a practice of keeping my radar transmitting even in good visibility and running an overlay on the chartplotter to keep me familiar with its drawbacks. The image above, for example, clearly shows that what the radar sees may not stack up with what the chart is telling me. Note how the trace seems mysteriously to end halfway up the coast. So it does, but that’s because the echo returning from high cliffs in the south gets lost when the land falls away to lower-lying estuarial terrain. The echo ends either because the flat shoreline isn’t providing a good enough target, or because the coast falls below the scanner’s visual horizon.

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